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  • Christopher Wren crosses the Atlantic
    Christopher Wren crosses the Atlantic
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    As part of the London Festival of Architecture, Jen Pedler will be running her new walk Once There Was a Church  which recounts the stories of how the remnants City of London churches connect the past to the present. You can join Jen’s walk on the 7th and 18th June (booking details are here), but…

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  • Mandate to Rule; a series of “election specials”
    Mandate to Rule; a series of “election specials”
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    Theresa May has called a snap election in search of a mandate for… well, whatever it is she wants a mandate for (she may yet let us know among the Lynton Crosby-inspired parroted soundbites), so we at Footprints of London towers thought we would call our own “snap theme week” with a series of walks…

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  • Walking the Walbrook
    Walking the Walbrook
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    To coincide with the Museum of London’s current free exhibition of archaeological finds from the river Walbrook, Tina Baxter will be running her Walbrook where art thou? walk on Saturday 25th March.  As the walk starts at the museum, you can take in this last chance to see the exhibition (it closes on the 26th…

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  • Charlie Chaplin’s Kennington
    Charlie Chaplin’s Kennington
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    Michael Duncan talks about Charlie Chaplin’s London, which features in new walk looking at art and entertainment in Lambeth, which has its debut on March 4th Everyone knows Charlie Chaplin.   “Iconic” is one of the laziest words used by writers when they seek to describe something or someone.  But it applies to Chaplin.  The little tramp,…

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  • All the World’s a Stage
    All the World’s a Stage
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    Dave Charnick charts the remarkable career of theatre impresario Sir Peter Daubeny and his contribution in bringing international theatre to London. You can discover more on Dave’s walk Behind the Magic Curtain on February 2nd, booking details on his walks page. In 1960 the Royal Shakespeare Company arrived at the Aldwych Theatre, intending to stay…

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  • At the Heart of the Hop Trade
    At the Heart of the Hop Trade
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    David Charnick’s new walk Booze and The Borough heads south of the river to explore the historical links between the area and all aspects of the drinks trade.  You can join him on November 2nd for the full story (click the link above to go to his booking page), but meantime by way of “a…

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  • The Real London of Ripper Street
    The Real London of Ripper Street
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    After the tragic and thrilling denouement of series four of Ripper Street and as we all eagerly await series five, Sean Patterson has been looking into quite how much of this superb drama is rooted in the real East End of the time. As a fan of the BBC drama Ripper Street I’ve always been…

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  • Wilkie Collins and the secret marriage
    Wilkie Collins and the secret marriage
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    Jen Pedler writes about the complicated private life of Victorian Novelist Wilkie Collins. You can find out more on Jen’s walk “Walk Wilkie’s Way” on Thursday 6th October at 11am which is part of our Literary Footprints Festival Illegitimacy, bigamy, matrimonial irregularity, complex wills, murder, legalistic deception, financial skulduggery… all this and more features in the…

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  • Orwell In The Clink
    Orwell In The Clink
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    Next in our series of Literary Footprints 2016 posts, David Charnick recounts the young Eric Blair’s early brushes with the law in the East End and how he put those experiences to use when creating one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. On the evening of Saturday 19 December 1931, a man was…

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  • ‘Bertie learns how to write’: The apprenticeship of HG Wells
    ‘Bertie learns how to write’: The apprenticeship of HG Wells
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    With our annual Literary Footprints Festival just around the corner, Robin Rowles recounts some of the early endeavours of one of our greatest authors of science fiction. HG Wells is best known as the author of The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds and many other scientific romances. However, before penning these timeless works,…

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