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  • A Not Very Special Relationship: John Adams In London
    A Not Very Special Relationship: John Adams In London
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    With the “special relationship” under a new post-Brexit scrutiny and our cousins across the pond in election fever, Michael Duncan explores the London connection of maybe the most forgotten of the Founding Fathers. John Adams, the Second President of the United States, is overshadowed by his fellow founding fathers. George Washington towered over him physically…

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  • August is History in the Hols month!
    August is History in the Hols month!
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    Been a tough year for parents hasn’t it? As if the stress of SATs for 10 and 11 year olds wasn’t enough, the Pound’s recent nosedive has, for many, put the annual two-week escape to the beaches of Europe in jeopardy. So with summer upon us and a “staycation” boom apparently in full flow, the…

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  • There ain’t no cure for the Ealing blues
    There ain’t no cure for the Ealing blues
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    As if Ealing’s claim to fame as the hotbed of a peculiarly British type of film comedy wasn’t enough, Alan Fortune relates the story of how an unprepossessing back street in deepest Ealing also reveals the location of the birth of one of the most important movements in British music. Across the road from Ealing…

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  • London and The Battle of Jutland
    London and The Battle of Jutland
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    31st May sees the hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Jutland. Although the Battle was fought far out in the North Sea, it left its mark on London. The Battle of Jutland was the largest naval battle of World War One, the long anticipated clash between the battleships that Germany and Britain had been building…

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  • Kings and Queens in London – Edward I
    Kings and Queens in London – Edward I
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    Our series looking at the legacy of Kings and Queens in London continues with Edward I. Edward I was in Sicily returning from fighting the crusades when his father Henry III died in 1272. Edward and his wife Eleanor, who he had married at the age of 15, made a very leisurely return to London, where Edward…

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  • Six Degrees of Separation – well almost!
    Six Degrees of Separation – well almost!
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    Further to her earlier post on the travails of a group of Fleet Street ladies in gaining the same rights of their male counterparts in a local watering hole, Tina Baxter returns to share more fascinating stories of characters and connections along one of London’s most infamous thoroughfares. As I am sure happens with the…

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  • All that Glisters is not Gold
    All that Glisters is not Gold
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    The City of London has been a key centre of trading since its foundation by the Romans.  As part of our special season of Shakespeare walks to mark the 400th anniversary of his death, David Charnick explores how one aspect of this defining characteristic influenced Shakespeare and his fellow dramatists. A Moroccan prince, faced with…

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  • Wild goose chase
    Wild goose chase
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    April is Shakespeare month here at Footprints of London as we launch a special series of walks to mark the 400th anniversary of The Bard’s death.  To get us all in the mood, Neil Sinclair recounts the fascinating story of a potential mystery involving Shakespeare’s head. William Shakespeare’s heart was always in Stratford upon Avon…

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  • Ann vs. Lucy: Two London women and the English Civil War
    Ann vs. Lucy: Two London women and the English Civil War
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    To ease us out of our special series of walks celebrating International Women’s Day, Robin Rowles recounts the story of two young ladies who found themselves on the opposite sides of the greatest divide in England’s history. “Behind every great man, there is a great woman”. This well-known proverb was certainly true during one of…

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  • The only woman ever to be tortured at the Tower
    The only woman ever to be tortured at the Tower
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    In the latest in our special series of posts on our International Women’s Day series of walks, Jill Finch tells the tragic tale of Anne Askew, a woman who made the ultimate sacrifice for her conviction in her beliefs. On the death of her sister, the 15 year-old Anne Askew was married to her Catholic…

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