RiverWalks

Footprints of London And Totally Thames Festival 2017

Totally Thames Festival

From the Roman era to the present day London has relied on its rivers for life, trade, transport and recreation.

This September the Footprints of London guides have teamed up with Totally Thames Festival to celebrate the many and varied roles the Thames has played in the story of London.

IMG_0016IMG_7131Riverwalks Festival 1588 (2)

Walks cost £12 each (£9 concessions),

festival walks

To Constable's Castle - A Walk From Leigh on Sea

Wed, 27 Sep

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: A walk to Hadleigh Castle – with spectacular views of the Thames Estuary that ere painted by Constable

The City Bridges

Fri, 29 Sep

Your guide: Stephen Benton
Description: This walk explores the bridges which lead to and from the City of London from Blackfriars to Tower Bridge (although technically the latter is just outside the City). This tells the story of how these bridges came to be built and paid for.

To Constable's Castle - A Walk From Leigh on Sea

Sat, 30 Sep

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: A walk to Hadleigh Castle – with spectacular views of the Thames Estuary that ere painted by Constable

Hammersmith Riverside - Arts and Crafts and a Familiar Type

Sat, 30 Sep

Your guide: Stephen Benton
Description: A pleasant stroll along the delightful riverside at Hammersmith

The Edge of Oil City - A Walk in Canvey Island

Wed, 4 Oct

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: The quieter side of Canvey Island – walking along 8 miles of river wall looking at the history of the island known for holidays, oil refineries and Dr Feelgood

Mouth of the River - Thorpe Bay to Shoeburyness

Wed, 11 Oct

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: The last of Rob’s walks along the Thames – ending up at the mouth of the river at Shoeburyness – where you can usualy find Victorian pottery on the beach

Mouth of the River - Thorpe Bay to Shoeburyness

Sat, 14 Oct

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: The last of Rob’s walks along the Thames – ending up at the mouth of the river at Shoeburyness – where you can usualy find Victorian pottery on the beach

Tidemarks from the Pool

Sat, 21 Oct

Your guide: David Charnick
Description: A tour to the heart of London’s maritime trade, when the river and docks were alive with shipping and the area full of sailors ashore after months of hardship.

The New River - Islington's Lost Waterway

Wed, 25 Oct

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: The New River was one of the 17th Century’s greatest feats of engineering – this walk traces its route through Islington. You’ll see some of London’s oldest industrial buildings sitting in a car park and a delightful park that is one of Islington’s best secrets

Walking the Hidden River Fleet

Sun, 29 Oct

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: A whole day of walking and history with Jenni and Rob, following the course of the River Fleet from springs on Hampstead Heath, to the Thames near Blackfriars

Walking the Hidden Upper Tyburn River

Sat, 25 Nov

Your guide: Jenni Bowley
Description: Hampstead, Belsize Park and Swiss Cottage have a hidden secret shared with Buckingham Palace – the river Tyburn flows beneath! For centuries the source of drinking water for the City of London and the water supply for the lake in Regents Park come and see where its upper reaches once flowed.

Walking the Hidden Lower Tyburn River

Sat, 25 Nov

Your guide: Rhona Levene
Description: We walk the route of the underground River Tyburn Baker Street down to the Thames and travelling through Marylebone and Mayfair.

Walking the Hidden River Fleet

Sat, 20 Jan

Your guide: Rob Smith
Description: A whole day of walking and history with Jenni and Rob, following the course of the River Fleet from springs on Hampstead Heath, to the Thames near Blackfriars

These events are part of Totally Thames that runs from 1-30 September 2017.
www.totallythames.org/

 totally thames

 

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